Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Nina Wu Review: A Painful and Powerful Film About Succeeding In A Cut Throat Industry

Ke-Xi Wu	...	Nina Wu Vivian Sung	Vivian Sung	...	Kiki Kimi Hsia	Kimi Hsia	...	No.3 Rest of cast listed alphabetically: Li-Ang Chang	Li-Ang Chang		 Jen-Shuo Cheng	Jen-Shuo Cheng		 Ping-Chun Cheng	Ping-Chun Cheng		 Ying-Hsuan Hsieh	Ying-Hsuan Hsieh		 Shang-Ho Huang	Shang-Ho Huang		 Lee-zen Lee	Lee-zen Lee		 Ming-Shuai Shih	Ming-Shuai Shih		 Shau-Ching Sung	Shau-Ching Sung		 Chih-Wei Tang	Chih-Wei Tang		 Chuan Wang	Chuan Wang		 Moon Wang	Moon Wang		 An-Shun Yu	An-Shun Yu

Release date: April 2, 2021 (Virtual Cinema)
Running time: 104 minutes
Starring: 
Ke-Xi Wu, Yu-Hua Sung, Yu-Chiao Hsia, Ming-Shuai Shih
Directed by: Midi Z
Written by: Ke-Xi Wu, Midi Z

After toiling for years in bit-parts, aspiring actress Nina Wu (Ke-Xi Wu, who also co-wrote the script based on her own personal experiences) finally gets her big break with a leading role in a spy thriller set in the 1960s. The part, which calls for nudity and explicit sex scenes, is made all the more challenging thanks to the director’s unending belittlements. While seemingly on the brink of professional triumph, Nina’s psychological resolve begins to crack under the pressure. As she rushes to her childhood home following a family emergency, Nina begins suffering paranoid fantasies that a mysterious woman is stalking and attacking her. As Nina clings to memories of happier times, it seems that there is one crucial memory that she is repressing.

Produced by  Midi Z	...	producer Joanne Goh	...	executive producerMusic by  Giong Lim	Cinematography by  Florian Zinke	Film Editing by  Matthieu Laclau	 Yann-Shan Tsai	Art Direction by  Chih-Da Kuo	Costume Design by  Cheuk Ming Chan	 Cho Ting Chung	Sound Departmen
Nina Wu has a bold style bold, which is needed to tell thsi bold story.  Writer and star Ke-Xi Wu draws from her own traumatic experiences to create this film and its painful yet powerful subject matter.  And this vision is brought to life by co-writer and director Midi Z.  The film has striking, solid colors that are evident from the poster and continue throughout the story.  Prominent colors and scenes are repeated as Nina begins to unpack some of the traumas that have happened to her.  The film also has some fantastic camera angles to help tell the story, and some really powerful scenes where the movie within the movie is being filmed.  And these colors become even more bold when the surreal parts of the story are explored.   The film has scenes from Nina's psyche interspersed throughout the story, which provide an interesting break but can also be confusing as sometimes they are not clearly called out.  But they also crucially reveal small parts of the story, a story that becomes more clear as the film goes on.

The core of this film, and what it really should be celebrated for, is that it depicts the level of dedication that actors have to their craft.  Nina Wu is beaten, abused, tormented, and worse in her quest to succeed in the field that she desperately wants to, and forced to go outside her comfort zone to try and do this.  This happens subtly, such as by those who seemingly are supposed to have her best interests at heart, and not so subtly, such as a director who torments and assaults her in an attempt to coax some additional emotion into her performance.  And through this all, Nina Wu must maintain the façade that everything is alright in order to deal with the press and social media.  It is a sharp contrast and one that can be tough to watch at times (especially as the depth of her abuse is explored).  But it is an important film to highlight these abuses, made all the more powerful by the fact that this is based on her own personal experiences.  Especially in our hyper socialized media, Nina Wu showcases the pressures to succeed and the need to artificially shrug off and suppress those pressures to cultivate a public image.

Nina Wu is a painful and powerful film, with a bold style and striking performances, telling a story that looks at the pressures and abuses to succeed in a cut throat industry.

Watch it.

Directed by  Midi Z	Writing Credits (in alphabetical order)   Ke-Xi Wu	 Midi Z   Sound Department  Cheng Chou	...	sound Chun-Yi Li	...	boom operator Danfeng Li	...	sound Morgan Yen	...	soundVisual Effects by  Min-Gze Chen	...	visual effects Tzung-Min Wang	...	visual effects (as Tzung-Min Lin) Yi-Shiuan Wang	...	visual effects ArChin Yen	...	visual effectsAdditional Crew  Maher Diab	...	Distribution Alaa Karkouti	...	Distribution

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Nina Wu is playing in virtual cinemas across the chereountry.  For more information and for showtimes click here.

Luz Review: A Beautiful Film About Love and Life

Ernesto Reyes	...	Ruben Jesse Tayeh	Jesse Tayeh	...	Carlos Jimmy Garcia	Jimmy Garcia	...	Sal Alma Gloria Garcia	Alma Gloria Garcia	...	Benilda Lowell Deo	Lowell Deo	...	Officer Dowden Rega Lupo	Rega Lupo	...	Julio Marian Mendez	Marian Mendez	...	Valerie Evie Riojas	Evie Riojas	...	Adriana

Release date: March 19, 2021
Running time: 120 minutes
Directed by: Jon Garcia
Starring: Ernesto Reyes & Jesse Tayeh

Ruben Gonzales (Ernesto Reyes) is a young latino man who’s fallen into the world of the mafiosos. When an accident leads him into incarceration, his relationship with the cartel and with his family is strained. While in prison, he falls in the complex hierarchical system until his cellmate and eventual lover Carlos (Jesse Tayeh), comes to his side and helps him find emotional and financial stability. When the two me are released from prison 2 years apart, they again meet on the outside and while dealing with the circumstances that had them incarcerated in the first place, they ponder whether what they once had was real or just two people hoping to seek light in a dark place.

Willis Argetsinger	Willis Argetsinger	...	Adult in custody Virgil Bohnenkamp	Virgil Bohnenkamp	...	Adult in custody Lucas Burton	Lucas Burton	...	Yard Prison Guard Kristin Busch	Kristin Busch	...	Customer at Auto Body shop J.D. Caneals	J.D. Caneals	...	Adult in custody Isai Dale	Isai Dale	...	Property Guard Charles Gallardo	Charles Gallardo	...	Adult in custody Shawn M. Hall	Shawn M. Hall	...	Adult in custody John Hamilton	John Hamilton	...	Adult in custody Lloyd Hartzell	Lloyd Hartzell	...	Adult in custody Bruce Jennings	Bruce Jennings	...	Martin Geddy Johnson	Geddy Johnson	...	Adult in custody Alba Larsen	Alba Larsen	...	Marisa Jahi Moody	Jahi Moody	...	Adult in custody Eddie Passadore	Eddie Passadore	...	Priest Yolanda Porter	Yolanda Porter	...	Officer Martinez
Luz is a special film that breaks many molds.  It portrays a prison system that is breaks you down filled with differing, often conflicted factions; but it also shows some inmates that are willing to support and build you up.  It is a Latino film rooted in a culture of masculinity, but also shows two men coming to terms with their sexuality and being open about it.  And it is a film about surviving in the prison system and in life that is also delicately put together with beautiful shots and lovely music.  It is also refreshing to see a film about minorities in the prison system with a more positive message.  The prison that Ruben and Carlos are incarcerated in is a hierarchical system, so the pair do what they need to to survive.  But overall, you see a prison situation that shows more support and positivity than you normally experience in film. 

The film's story develops slowly and if you don't know much about what happens beforehand you will be in for a surprise and a treat.  The movie has several phases and builds as Ruben and Carlos become friends and then some.  It has nice camera work and a slow pace that let you get to know these characters before the real emotion in the film happens.  And I really liked seeing these initial prison scenes, and the way that Ruben is forced to adapt in a situation that he is clearly not prepared for.  You can tell that he is out of his element in many respects, and has to adapt quickly to make sure he survives.  

And although the film can be overdramatic at times, especially in the early sections, it still is such a treat to watch.  To see the interactions between Reyes and Tayeh, the unspoken aspects of their relationship, and the way it develops was such a pleasure to see.  And it is interesting to see this development in terms of Ruben's character becoming more comfortable and familiar with the prison system, and eventually with life outside.  As Ruben gets more experienced and confident in his situation, he also becomes more confident in who he is.  And Luz does not hold back in its depictions of Ruben and Carlos's relationship.  Their relationship is complicated, nuanced, and beautiful, and develops throughout the film.  And it is also refreshing to see support from those around them, which is a testament to this film and the more accepting nature of society today.

Luz breaks the mold and a lot of film conventions, portraying a complicated and beautiful Latino relationship with a slow burning story, supportive characters, and wonderful music.   

Watch it.

Dimitrius Pryce	...	Adult in custody Eduardo Reyes	Eduardo Reyes	...	Jamie Kenneth Allan Robertson	Kenneth Allan Robertson	...	Adult in custody Eric Schechter	Eric Schechter	...	Adult in custody Willard Waggoner	Willard Waggoner	...	Adult in custody Fredrick M. Wenger Jr.	Fredrick M. Wenger Jr.	...	Adult in custody Jason Wochaski	Jason Wochaski	...	Adult in custody       Directed by  Jon Garcia	Writing Credits (in alphabetical order)   Jon Garcia
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Luz is available digitally and on demand on March 19, 2021. 

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Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Drive All Night Review: A Stylish Noir Film

Yutaka Takeuchi	...	Dave Lexy Hammonds	Lexy Hammonds	...	Cara Sarah Dumont	Sarah Dumont	...	Morgan Johnny Gilligan	Johnny Gilligan	...	Lenny Will Springhorn	Will Springhorn	...	Frank Natalia Berger	Natalia Berger	...	Midnight Judy Ali Jahangiri	Ali Jahangiri	...	Fred Vonn Scott Bair	Vonn Scott Bair	...	Boss James J. Der Jr.	James J. Der Jr.	...	Marv / Stage Actor Mia Jómor	Mia Jómor	...	Waitress Rest of cast listed alphabetically: J.J. Ryder	J.J. Ryder	...	Bartender Stephanie Whigham	Stephanie Whigham	...	Model 1

Release date: March 20, 2021
Running time: 94 minutes
Directed by: Peter Hsieh
Starring:  Yutaka Takeuchi, Lexy Hammonds, Sarah Dumont, Johnny Gilligan

‘Drive All Night’ follows Dave (Yutaka Takeuchi), a reclusive swing-shift taxi driver, whose night takes an unexpected turn after he picks up a mysterious passenger, Cara (Lexy Hammonds), a young woman hiding a dark secret. As she makes him drive through the city on a series of bizarre excursions, things get increasingly more surreal the further into the night they go. Sarah Dumont (‘Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse,’ ‘The Royals’) plays Morgan, a sympathetic waitress who works at a diner that Dave often frequents, while Johnny Gilligan plays Lenny, an obsessive hitman guided by strange visions, who pursues our protagonists through the night.

Directed by  Peter Hsieh	Writing Credits (in alphabetical order)   Peter Hsieh	Produced by  Ali Jahangiri	...	producer Sam Chou	...	executive producer Windy Chou	...	producer Robert Daniel Thomas	...	producer Grace Hsieh	...	producer Henry Hsieh	...	producer Stella Hsieh	...	producer Christopher Au	...	executive producer Stephanie Whigham	...	producer Peter Hsieh	...	producer Marius Layus	...	line producer Lexy Hammonds	...	producer Jonathan Quesenberry	...	producer
Drive All Night's wonderful style will get you hooked on the film early on.  It has a great use of 80s colors and sounds to put you in the right frame of mind.  Despite this film being set in modern times, the movie has a decidedly classic look and feel, with film grain and other imperfections intoduced to the final product.  And the movie also has prominent use of neon lights and colors throughout the night to help evoke a different time.  In fact, the color choices are bold and striking; colored lights are used to highlight dream sequences and surreal experiences that occur throughout this strange night.  

And my favorite part of this movie is that the filmmakers clearly loved classic video games.  There are a lot of random video game references and facts that Cara tells Dave, and each time it made me smile.  Additionally, the film uses chiptunes sound effects as sound effects and within the soundtrack.  And overall, the sounds contribute to the strong style of thils film, with the aforementioned classic sounds along with some surreal, otherworldly tracks and rock and roll.  Really, Drive All Night has its stylistic palette perfectly contracted, and lets you settle in for a strange and surreal night. And the style includes the characters, who have very deliberate choices in their wardrobe and mannerisms.  Cara especially has a fun style with her leather Nasa jacket.  The whole film evokes a Noir sense that will hook you early on.  

However, the story of Drive All Night left me wanting more.  It has a slow, quirky start which I loved, but as the night progresses it doesn't reveal much to the viewer.  The film has an out of order storytelling that reveals pieces of the movie throughout, and this can be confusing to follow.  Although the style definitely changes in some scenes, it was tough to tell where reality, dream sequences, and flashbacks ended.  Despite the film revealing additional information later in the movie, I never really felt like I got a good sense of what was going on.  This is not helped by an ending that left something to be desired, with a conclusion that does not quite wrap up what was an engaging start.  And mechanically, the film has some odd cuts that make it feel like there was not enough time or budget to redo shots, so they were tweaked in production.  This is not too distracting, but can be noticeable and contributes to the overall disjointed feel of the film.  It is a shame because I really loved what Drive All Night was doing; the style, sounds, and video game references had me hooked from the start.  But the story just didn't quite come together.  

Drive All Night has an 80s, video game, and noir inspiration, with bold colors, classic effects, and surreal sounds to keep you wondering during this wild night.

Rent it.

Music by  Robert Daniel Thomas	Cinematography by  William Hellmuth	Film Editing by  Guillermo Areizaga	 Peter Hsieh	Makeup Department  Carina Garcia	...	hair & make upProduction Management  Stephanie Whigham	...	production managerSound Department  Wayne Cheng	...	sound recordistCamera and Electrical Department  Guillermo Areizaga	...	grip Katherine Carpenter	...	assistant camera Dominic Cirigliano	...	2nd unit grip Christine Kelly	...	second assistant camera Mark Lopez	...	gaffer David Orr	...	additional photography Hunter Rodgers	...	key grip Emily Wohlford	...	2nd Unit Gaffer
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Tickets for ‘Drive All Night’ at Cinequest’s virtual screening room are on sale now at: www.cinequest.org

Godzilla vs. Kong Review: A Special Effects Spectacle Between Iconic Movie Monsters

Alexander Skarsgård	...	Nathan Lind Millie Bobby Brown	Millie Bobby Brown	...	Madison Russell Rebecca Hall	Rebecca Hall	...	Ilene Andrews Brian Tyree Henry	Brian Tyree Henry	...	Bernie Hayes Shun Oguri	Shun Oguri	...	Ren Serizawa Eiza González	Eiza González	...	Maya Simmons Julian Dennison	Julian Dennison	...	Josh Valentine Lance Reddick	Lance Reddick	...	Monarch Director Kyle Chandler	Kyle Chandler	...	Mark Russell Demián Bichir	Demián Bichir	...	Walter Simmons Kaylee Hottle	Kaylee Hottle	...	Jia Hakeem Kae-Kazim	Hakeem Kae-Kazim	...	Admiral Wilcox Ronny Chieng	Ronny Chieng	...	Jay Wayne John Pirruccello	John Pirruccello	...	Horace Chris Chalk	Chris Chalk	...	Ben

Release date: March 31, 2021
Running time: 113 minutes
Directed by: Adam Wingard
Starring: Alexander Skarsgård, Millie Bobby Brown, Rebecca Hall, 
Brian Tyree Henry, Shun Oguri, Eiza González, Julian Dennison, Lance Reddick, Kyle Chandler, Demián Bichir

The epic next chapter in the cinematic Monsterverse pits two of the greatest icons in motion picture history against one another - the fearsome Godzilla and the mighty Kong - with humanity caught in the balance.  In a story that is held together by the loosest of threads, Godzilla is attacking Apex Technologies and a crew of scientists try to use Kong to distract Godzilla by . . . well I won't really go into specifics because it doesn't make sense anyways.  And if you are going to see this movie, you know that it's not for the story.

Benjamin Rigby	...	Sonar Operator Nick Turello	Nick Turello	...	Apex Cybernetics Armed Guard Daniel Nelson	Daniel Nelson	...	Hayworth Priscilla Doueihy	Priscilla Doueihy	...	Monarch Mission Tech Kei Kudo	Kei Kudo	...	HEAV Pilot Bradd Buckley	Bradd Buckley	...	HEAV Pilot John Walton	John Walton	...	HEAV Co-Pilot Daniel Tuiara	Daniel Tuiara	...	HEAV Co-Pilot David Castillo	David Castillo	...	Maia Apex Cybernetics Guard Kofi Yiadom	Kofi Yiadom	...	Maia Apex Cybernetics Guard Jim Palmer	Jim Palmer	...	Maia Apex Cybernetics Guard Rest of cast listed alphabetically: Jacob Turner	Jacob Turner	...	(credit only) Travis Arrington	Travis Arrington	...	Refugee (uncredited) Dimitri Belke	Dimitri Belke	...	Monarch Flight Crew (uncredited) Chellé Brooks	Chellé Brooks	...	Party Goer (uncredited) Eli Burbage	Eli Burbage	...	Young Technician (uncredited) Curtis Bush	Curtis Bush	...	Admiral (uncredited) Linda Cairns	Linda Cairns	...	Monarch Worker (uncredited) Svitlana Campbell	Svitlana Campbell	...	APEX Employee (uncredited) Kadrolsha Ona Carole	Kadrolsha Ona Carole	...	Monarch Technician (uncredited) Amanda Chang	Amanda Chang	...	Monarch Worker (uncredited)
Godzilla vs. Kong is a special effects extravaganza with two epic movie monsters finally battling it out on land, sea, and even below the earth's crust.  The film has some extravagant and extra destructive battles that see these two Apex Predators destroying cities, ships, and everything in between.  This is really a movie that you want to see on a big screen with a booming sound system.  The titans should be towering and their battles should shake the room.  And Godzilla vs. Kong doesn't just pull out all the stops for the effects, the cast of this film is an all star group of some very talented actors.  I loved seeing them collected on the big screen, including some favorites like Rebecca Hall, Alexander Skarsgård, Kyle Chandler, and Julian Dennison.  Seriously, this cast was a treat to see and even more fun to see in a summer blockbuster.

But as I mentioned before, the story of this film just doesn't make sense.  Like the previous Godzilla movie, Legendary Pictures tried to give the new movies in its Monsterverse a more historical perspective and apocalyptic consequence, with mixed results.  It was a nice idea to try and make these monsters ancient combatants, but in practice it just doesn't really come together.  And the story has a few disjointed plot threads that don't really relate, despite them interweaving towards the end of the film.  It mixes different sci fi concepts to varying degrees of success, and sometimes just takes these concepts and simplifies them for the film or doesn't fully explain them.  I was struggling to follow the story throughout and kept wondering why things were happening in certain ways.  And on top of that, the writing does not feel natural.  The film has an all star cast with some very accomplished actors, and then hampers them with bad science fiction concepts and unnatural dialogue.  It is distracting at times, and thankfully the film is saved by its action.  But even the action isn't fool proof, as I often felt like the CG was too overdone.  The movie at times felt like watching Ready Player One, except that it was supposed to take place in a science fiction reality and not virtual reality.  But that being said, the film has some really exciting effects, explosions, and some great lighting.  If you are looking for a gigantic grudge match between two superstar combatants, then this might be the summer movie in March for you.

Godzilla vs. Kong is a special effects spectacle, with an all-star cast and an epic showdown between iconic Hollywood monsters.

Rent it.

Barry Havenga	...	Engineer (uncredited) Charmain Jackson	Charmain Jackson	...	Apex Lab Technician (uncredited) Timothy Christian Jansen	Timothy Christian Jansen	...	Tourist (uncredited) Raynesa Jonas	Raynesa Jonas	...	Monarch Technician (uncredited) Kaylee Kristin	Kaylee Kristin	...	Yacht Party Goer (uncredited) Alice Lanesbury	Alice Lanesbury	...	Bar Patron #1 (uncredited) Santi Lawson	Santi Lawson	...	Apex Lab Techs (uncredited) Sonny Le	Sonny Le	...	Thug (uncredited) Jasmine Liew	Jasmine Liew	...	Asian Kid (uncredited) Victoria Liu	Victoria Liu	...	Heav Pilot #3 (uncredited) Steve Maggs	Steve Maggs	...	Bar Patron (uncredited) Van Marten	Van Marten	...	Dr. Chen's Assistant (uncredited) Clay Mason	Clay Mason	...	Refugee (uncredited) Niam Mayes	Niam Mayes	...	Us Navy (uncredited) Shawn McBride	Shawn McBride	...	Fisherman (uncredited) Austin Morrison	Austin Morrison	...	Monarch Military (uncredited) Sofia Nolan	Sofia Nolan	...	Mean Girl (uncredited) Luis Pereira	Luis Pereira	...	Monarch Military (uncredited) Joel Pierce	Joel Pierce	...	Monarch Tech #2 (uncredited) Jon Quested	Jon Quested	...	Construction Worker (uncredited) Diezel Ramos	Diezel Ramos	...	Monarch Military (uncredited) Tasneem Roc	Tasneem Roc	...	Reporter (uncredited) Charles Sans	Charles Sans	...	APEX Guard (uncredited) Daniel Santana Jr.	Daniel Santana Jr.	...	Party Goer (uncredited) Scott M. Schewe	Scott M. Schewe	...	Fisherman (uncredited) Rob Schyff	Rob Schyff	...	Cafe patron (uncredited) Sen Shao	Sen Shao	...	Thug (uncredited) Andrea Elizabeth Sikkink	Andrea Elizabeth Sikkink	...	Driver / Passerby (uncredited) Jason Speer	Jason Speer	...	Monarch Board Member (uncredited) Jason Szabo	Jason Szabo	...	Monarch Tactical Guard (uncredited) Lara Thomas	Lara Thomas	...	News Reporter (uncredited) Grisel Toledo	Grisel Toledo	...	Apex Guard (uncredited) Jason Virgil	Jason Virgil	...	Bartender (uncredited) Scott Wallace	Scott Wallace	...	Monarch Guard (uncredited) Amber Walls	Amber Walls	...	Refugee (uncredited) Drew Walton	Drew Walton	...	David Lind (uncredited) Ken Watanabe	Ken Watanabe	...	Bar Patron (uncredited) Felicia Wickliff	Felicia Wickliff	...	APEX Guard (uncredited) Lachlan Winters	Lachlan Winters	...	School kid (uncredited) Tara Wraith	Tara Wraith	...	Monarch Flight Crew (uncredited)
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Godzilla vs. Kong is available in theaters and on HBO Max on March 31, 2021.  It will leave HBO Max in late April.  For tickets to see it in theaters, click here

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Friday, March 26, 2021

What to Watch This Weekend: Shoplifters of the World, Truffle Hunters, Nobody, The Arbors, Blood Moon, News of the World, Soul, Boogie

For A Rebellious Music-Filled Night: Shopkeepers of the World (Theaters and Digital)
Shoplifters of the World is a musical journey through the Smith's discography, fueled by this rebellious soundtrack and the dreams, disappointments, and angst of youth.  For more information, check out the review!

For An Action-Filled John Wick-like: Nobody (Theaters)
Nobody is a middle class, family man John Wick, with high energy and varied action, a mysterious story, and an epic, final fightsravaganza.  For more information, check out the review!

For A Sumptuous and Fulfilling Documentary: The Truffle Hunters (Theaters)
The Truffle Hunters chronicles this unique business and its wonderful participants with sumptuous shots that let you fully savor the joy and traditions of this lifestyle.  For more information, check out the review!

For A Psychological, Dramatic Creature Feature: The Arbors (Digital)
The Arbors uses its wonderfully unsettling atmosphere, camera work, and unconventional story to deliver a more dramatic, psychological take on the creature feature.  For more information, check out the review!

For A Slow Burn Horror Film: Into the Dark: Blood Moon (Hulu)
Into the Dark: Blood Moon's measured, interesting, and mysterious story and great characters will leave a full moon-sized impression on you.  For more information, check out the review!

For Some Additional March Madness: Boogie (Theaters and Digital)
Boogie scores some easy points with its realistic setting and wonderful characters and uses sports to explore issues of race, dreams, and realities.  For more information, check out the review!

For A Simpler Time: News of the World (Redbox)
News of the World shows the power of information and connection in a unique western setting, delivering a wonderful performance by Zengel and two hours of signature Tom Hanks!  For more information, check out the review!

For One Some Amazing Animation And Music: Soul (Redbox)
Soul will reinvigorate your heart and soul, with its stunning animation, wonderfully diverse characters and focus on black culture, and humorous and heartfelt story.  For more information, check out the review!

The Arbors Review: A Dramatic, Psychological, Unconventional Creature Feature

Drew Matthews	...	Ethan Daunes Ryan Davenport	Ryan Davenport	...	Shane Daunes Sarah Cochrane	Sarah Cochrane	...	Robin Daunes Daryl Munroe	Daryl Munroe	...	Connie Tern Alexandra Rose	Alexandra Rose	...	Lynn Daunes (as Lexi Rose) Brooks Addis	Brooks Addis	...	Brody Capra Tony Hughes	Tony Hughes	...	Officer Bensi Noah Lewis	Noah Lewis	...	Alex Birman Mark Hayes	Mark Hayes	...	Officer Jones Evan Henry	Evan Henry	...	Aaron Fletcher Morgan Carson	Morgan Carson	...	Paul Don Scarborough	Don Scarborough	...	Chuck Joe Stanlonis	Joe Stanlonis	...	Wyatt Langston McAdoo	Langston McAdoo	...	Logan Kathryn Alexander	Kathryn Alexander	...	News Reporter (as Kate Alexander) John S. Rushton	John S. Rushton	...	Nick Birman Neil Soffer	Neil Soffer	...	Mike's Corps

Release date: March 26, 2021
Running time: 121 minutes
Directed by: Clayton Witmer
Starring Drew Matthews, Ryan Davenport, Sarah Cochrane, Daryl Munroe, Lexi Rose, and Brooks Addis

Set against a dreary small town, The Arbors follows Ethan Daunes, a reclusive locksmith struggling to keep ties with his younger brother, Shane. Ethan's life takes an unsettling turn after finding a strange small creature and forming a mysterious connection. After a string of unexplained killings, the creature's true nature is soon revealed, and Ethan finds himself at the center of panic and paranoia.

Jordan Nelson	...	Mike (voice) Olivia Griffin	Olivia Griffin	...	Radio Reporter (voice) Phillip Lynch	Phillip Lynch	...	Televangelist (voice) Dré Starks	Dré Starks	...	Man in White (voice) Peter Witmer	Peter Witmer	...	Police Officer (voice) Samantha Witmer	Samantha Witmer	...	Dispatcher Rest of cast listed alphabetically: Michael Helms	Michael Helms	...	Mitchell
The Arbors is a masterclass in atmosphere, as the film uses its setting, the time of day, and camera angles perfectly to keep you on edge.  Most of the movie takes place at night, where shadows just outside the view of the main camera, or small window slits showing a small beam of light will keep you wondering what is just outside your view.  And the setting likewise does this; set in a small rural town, most scenes have trees, brush, or old and abandoned home obscuring your view, making it seem like something is lurking in the dark.  And The Arbors's unsettling vibe is also accentuated by the sound design, which only reinforces your concern of something just outside your view.  There are creaks and snaps, unexplained noises and everything you would expect from a danger lurking around you.  And finally, the unsettling nature of the film is helped by the main character, who is quiet and reserved.  He just feels like there is something off about him, and although he is not a scary person, his actions and decisions seem strange throughout the film.  

And despite the Arbors being a creature feature, the sense of paranoia and unrest is the main villain.  The film wisely does not show much of the creature, relying on smart CG techniques giving only glimpses and pieces to show this main antagonist.  It makes it so that the Arbors doesn't suffer from what many creature features do, a general disappointment when the full reveal happens.  And strangely, the creature is only a minor character in this film.  It is more about small town paranoia and uncertainty, as well as the conflict between dreams and responsibilities.  A lot of the film deals with the main character's own conflicted nature, and his relationship to the town and his family.  Despite the external threat, the film looks more at the internal monsters of fear and paranoia.  However, if there is one complaint about this film, it is about one of its strengths.  The main character is just not very likeable.  His strange demeaner and unpredictable nature do help with the general unease, but overall he was not really someone I was rooting for.  His decision making was questionable and motivations were sometimes mixed.  But that is not a knock against Drew Matthews, as his portrayal was great and he fully encompassed Ethan.  I just didn't like the overall character and that led to less enjoyment in the story overall.  But that being said, the film has a great sense of atmosphere and is a very different take on your conventional creature feature.  I appreciated the overall product and the film as a whole!

The Arbors uses its wonderfully unsettling atmosphere and camera work, and unconventional story to deliver a more dramatic, psychological take on the creature feature.

Watch it.

Sebastian Twardosz	...	consulting producer Michael Samilow	...	producer Drew Matthews	...	associate producer Clayton Aggeles	...	producer Christian Larsen	...	executive producer Michael DeFosse	...	associate producer Mike Whelan	...	associate producer   Directed by  Clayton Witmer	Writing Credits (in alphabetical order)   Chelsey Cummings	 Clayton Witmer
If you liked this review and want to see more from Watch or Pass, please consider 
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The Arbors is available digitally and on demand on March 26, 2021. 

For additional information about the film and to rent / buy it, check it out at the links below.

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Into the Dark: Blood Moon Review: A Slow Burning and Mysterious Family Story

Megalyn Echikunwoke	...	Esme Rawls Yonas Kibreab	Yonas Kibreab	...	Luna Joshua Dov	Joshua Dov	...	Sam Marco Rodríguez	Marco Rodríguez	...	Miguel Gareth Williams	Gareth Williams	...	Barlow Townes Jack Yang	Jack Yang	...	Joseph Brian R. Norris	Brian R. Norris	...	Deputy Hammond (as Brian Norris) Jan Munroe	Jan Munroe	...	Dr. Rainer Patrick Day	Patrick Day	...	Julian (as Patrick W. Day) Danielle Juliet Ma	Danielle Juliet Ma	...	Nurse

Release date: March 26, 2021
Running time: 85 minutes
Starring: Megalyn Echikunwoke, Yonas Kibreab, Joshua Dov, Marco Rodriguez 

Into the Dark is a Hulu collaboration with Blumhouse to make a monthly movie-length horror feature from Jason Blum’s independent TV studio. Each feature-length installment is inspired by a holiday and features Blumhouse’s signature genre/thriller spin on the story.  Into the Dark's Season Two finale, Blood Moon, is inspired by the full moon.  When Esme (Megalyn Echikunwoke) and her ten-year-old son, Luna (Yonas Kibreab), move to a small desert town looking for a fresh start they attract all the wrong kinds of attention. As the locals begin to probe, Esme must battle to protect her son and a terrifying secret before the next full moon threatens their very existence.

Evan Williams	Evan Williams		 Zachary Michael Cruz	Zachary Michael Cruz	...	Party Kid (uncredited) Produced by  Tevin Adelman	...	producer Jason Blum	...	executive producer Scott Fort	...	line producer Alexander Koehne	...	executive producer Markus Bishop-Hill	...	associate producer Lauren Downey	...	executive producerMusic by  Jay Wadley	...	composer
Blood Moon has a slow, mysterious start that will keep you wondering what is happening to this nomadic family.  There are hints of the explanation behind Esme's need to keep moving and Luna's strange behavior, but you don't really get a great sense of the full predicament until later in the episode.  And that is thanks to Echikunwoke's great portrayal of a guarded, independent mother trying to make the best of her current situation.  Her caution is understandable given her background, and it is interesting to see the town's reaction to a persona that they are not used to.  Yonas Kibreab also does a great job as a conflicted boy, who has his own burdens to bear but also wants to just be a kid.  And he has to handle a few personality shifts in this, and does so naturally.  I was very impressed by this young actor's performance and looking forward to see what he does next.

As I mentioned, the storytelling has a slower pace but I appreciated that about it.  There were occasional flashbacks to earlier times for the family to fill in the backstory.  And although you do eventually get a full picture, the film retains its air of mystery throughout most of it, only giving glimpses into this family's past.  The whole setup is relatively simple, but that doesn't mean it is not an interesting film to follow.  I also really liked the use of practical effects and the avoidance of big CG spectacles.  This film could have gone either way, but I'm thankful for the simpler, suspenseful approach.  If there are any negatives to Blood Moon, it is that the story kind of devolves at the end with a too convenient wrap up.  And there is a reveal that just did not carry the same gravity as what I had come to expect.  But overall, this is a great way to spend an evening with a slow building story and some mysterious lead performances.  Just make sure to check the moon phase before you do so there are no surprises! 

Into the Dark: Blood Moon's measured, interesting, and mysterious story and great characters will leave a full moon-sized impression on you.

Watch it.
Directed by  Emma Tammi	Writing Credits   Adam Mason	...	(written by) & Simon Boyes	...	(written by)
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Into the Dark: Blood Moon premieres on March 26, 2021 exclusively on Hulu

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Shoplifters of the World Review: A Tribute to the Smiths and the Energy of Youth

Helena Howard	...	Cleo Elena Kampouris	Elena Kampouris	...	Sheila James Bloor	James Bloor	...	Patrick Nick Krause	Nick Krause	...	Billy Ellar Coltrane	Ellar Coltrane	...	Dean Joe Manganiello	Joe Manganiello	...	Full Metal Mickey Rest of cast listed alphabetically: Thomas Lennon	Thomas Lennon	...	Uncle Dick Olivia Luccardi	Olivia Luccardi	...	Sandi Imani Lewis	Imani Lewis	...	Rita Celia Au	Celia Au	...	Siouxsie Chu Cameron Moulène	Cameron Moulène	...	David Geraldine Leer	Geraldine Leer	...	Billy's Mom Elliot Frances Flynn	Elliot Frances Flynn	...	Punk Paul Casey Sullivan	Casey Sullivan	...	Jock #2 Tonatiuh	Tonatiuh	...	Brian Briggs

Release date: March 26, 2021
Running time: 90 minutes        
Starring: Helena Howard, Ellar Coltrane, Elena Kampouris, Nick Krause, James Bloor, Thomas Lennon, and Joe Manganiello
Written and Directed by Stephen Kijak

In the Summer of 1987, four friends, reeling from the sudden break-up of the iconic British band The Smiths, embark on a night out of partying to mourn their musical loss. At the same time, an impassioned Smiths fan takes a local radio DJ hostage at gunpoint and forces him to play nothing but Smiths tracks. With the radio station playing as the soundtrack to their night, the friends go on a wild journey of self-discovery that will transform them forever. Featuring an incredible soundtrack – including 20 songs from The Smiths – Shoplifters of the World is a glorious ode to the craziness of the ‘80s and the power of music to change people’s lives.

Thomas Lennon	...	Uncle Dick Olivia Luccardi	Olivia Luccardi	...	Sandi Imani Lewis	Imani Lewis	...	Rita Celia Au	Celia Au	...	Siouxsie Chu Cameron Moulène	Cameron Moulène	...	David Geraldine Leer	Geraldine Leer	...	Billy's Mom Elliot Frances Flynn	Elliot Frances Flynn	...	Punk Paul Casey Sullivan	Casey Sullivan	...	Jock #2 Tonatiuh	Tonatiuh	...	Brian Briggs Sal Rendino	Sal Rendino	...	Billy's Dad Michalina Scorzelli	Michalina Scorzelli	...	Cleo's Mother Lucas Aurelio	Lucas Aurelio	...	Robert Smith Lookalike (as Lucas Phayre-Gonzalez) Kevin Aviance	Kevin Aviance	...	Amazing Grace Abby Awe	Abby Awe	...	Rita Vin Craig	Vin Craig	...	Police Officer Mike Lew	Mike Lew	...	Jock #1 Jonathan Campano	Jonathan Campano	...	Grove Patron
So first off, the soundtrack is just terrible; too much emo music and not enough metal!  (Just kidding).  I hadn't heard much of the Smiths before watching this delightful film and absolutely loved the soundtrack.  The film is a musical journey through the Smith's discography and smartly features the songs throughout this journey.  They are always there, in the background on the radio or in the foreground of the actions of the teens; a literal soundtrack to their wild night.  The movie is fueled by this rebellious soundtrack and the energy of youth.

And speaking of the youths, the cast is also phenomenal in this.  All 5 of the main teens do a great job of capturing the utter confusion and certainty of young people.  They're all trying to find their place and purpose in life.  And like many of us did, they identify with music to fuel their individuality and collective identity.  I liked that they were a collection of misfits; each having different personalities and motivations but drawn by their shared love of each other and their favorite band.  And special shout out to Joe Manganiello for his rocking portrayal of a radio DJ.  I loved his character and the easy way that fit as a metal head DJ.  All the acting was great, but Manganiello took it to the next level with a convincing performance as a metal head DJ.  And the characters all fit in this time period.  Director Stephen Kijak spent a lot of time making sure that his portrayal was accurate, even indoctrinating his cast with music of the time and teaching them to dance in an 80s appropriate way. And this all comes through in their portrayals.  

And the story of this film is, like your teens, slow but full of eventful and uneventful times.  The movie has a measured start, but really gets going as the night does.  And I did not mind the slow start at all' I loved learning about these teens and their various dreams, disappointments, and overall view of life.  And when the story picks up, it really becomes something special.  Like an angsty Empire Records, this film is a great encapsulation of teenage drama, dreams, and crushing realities.  Like a good album, Shoplifters of the World needs to be experienced from start to finish to truly appreciate it.  And one thing I really enjoyed was how throughout the film, people with very different ideas, interests, and views could get along and learn to appreciate each other.  Even in some very tense situations, by simply listening, talking, and seeing each other as human beings, these characters were able to gain a connection that can be sorely lacking in our current time.

Shoplifters of the World is a musical journey through the Smith's discography, fueled by this rebellious soundtrack and the dreams, disappointments, and angst of youth.

Watch it.

Monica Ayres	...	Morrissey Biker (uncredited) Kirsten Doyle	Kirsten Doyle	...	Morrissey Biker (uncredited) Austin Ferris	Austin Ferris	...	New Wave Dude (uncredited) Ciarra Fragale	Ciarra Fragale	...	Preppy (uncredited) Lexa Hayes	Lexa Hayes	...	Madonna Girl (uncredited) Talha Khan	Talha Khan	...	Punk (uncredited) Jose Maldonado	Jose Maldonado	...	Troubled Joe (uncredited) Kortnee Simmons	Kortnee Simmons	...	Morrissey Biker (uncredited) Nacia Walsh	Nacia Walsh	...	Counter girl (uncredited)    Directed by  Stephen Kijak	Writing Credits (in alphabetical order)   Lorianne Hall	...	(story) Stephen Kijak
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Shoplifters of the World is available in theaters, digitally, and on demand on March 26, 2021. 

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Wednesday, March 24, 2021

Interview: Yonas Kibreab from Into the Dark: Blood Moon, Werewolf Horror Film also starring Megalyn Echikunwoke

Yonas Kibreab, who plays Luna in the season 2 finale of Into the Dark: Blood Moon discusses how he started in acting and what it was like filming during quarantine. We also discuss the cast and how he likes his steaks! So give it a watch and make sure to check out Into the Dark: Blood Moon, streaming exclusively on Hulu on March 26, 2021! Starring: Megalyn Echikunwoke, Yonas Kibreab, Joshua Dov, Marco Rodriguez Synopsis: Into the Dark is a Hulu collaboration with Blumhouse to make a monthly movie-length horror feature from Jason Blum’s independent TV studio. Each feature-length installment is inspired by a holiday and features Blumhouse’s signature genre/thriller spin on the story. Into the Dark's Season Two finale, Blood Moon, is inspired by the full moon. When Esme (Megalyn Echikunwoke) and her ten-year-old son, Luna (Yonas Kibreab), move to a small desert town looking for a fresh start they attract all the wrong kinds of attention. As the locals begin to probe, Esme must battle to protect her son and a terrifying secret before the next full moon threatens their very existence.

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The Truffle Hunters Review: A Sumptuous and Fulfilling Look At This Unique Business

Release date: March 19, 2021
Running time: 84 minutes
Directors: Michael Dweck & Gregory Kershaw

Deep in the forests of Piedmont, Italy, a handful of men, seventy or eighty years young, hunt for the rare and expensive white Alba truffle—which to date has resisted all of modern science’s efforts at cultivation. They’re guided by a secret culture and training passed down through generations, as well as by the noses of their cherished and expertly trained dogs. They live a simpler, slower way of life, in harmony with their loyal animals and their picture-perfect land, seemingly straight out of a fairy tale. They’re untethered to cell phone screens or the Internet, opting instead to make their food and drink by hand and prioritizing in-person connections and community.

The demand for white truffles increases year after year, even as the supply decreases. As a result of climate change, deforestation, and the lack of young people taking up the mantle, the truffle hunters’ secrets are more coveted than ever. However, as it soon becomes clear, these ageing men may just hold something much more valuable than even this prized delicacy: the secret to a rich and meaningful life.

The Truffle Hunters has a slow, deliberate start but I loved it.  Like a wonderful meal, you don't want to rush in and The Truffle Hunters lets you enjoy this film experience.  It introduces us to this strange and wonderful cast of hunters who seem right out of a dramatic movie.  They are quirky, genuine, and above all love life and their dogs.  I really loved seeing the connection to both the land and their animals as it is something that is so genuine to see.  And each of the hunters are unique but also quite similar in how they operate and respect the work that they are doing.

These truffle hunters work in a very different market and with a very different mentality than what many of us are used to.  Seeing this contrast is really a joy to see.  I really loved seeing how this business operated; it almost seemed like it was from another time.  Trust of others and each other was tantamount, and the hunters were competitive but also friendly and supportive to each other.  They would show each other their prizes and take actual joy in seeing their friends / rivals succeed.  The camaraderie was palatable between these old friends.  And many of the business relationships were built on trust and loyalty, which seems to be something of the past in today's culture.  

And overall, this felt like a very different film.  It is a documentary, but there is no narration and sometimes no structure.  But it has wonderful, sumptuous shots that let you fully savor this life and this business.  There are beautiful images of the forest where the truffles are found, of the hunters in their houses, and of some delicious food and truffles.  Many of the shots are unconventional but all of them are just pure delicious filmmaking.  And some shots stay longer than I am used to, but I really loved seeing every scene in this glimpse into this wonderful lifestyle.

The Truffle Hunters chronicles this unique business and its wonderful participants with sumptuous shots that let you fully savor the joy and traditions of this lifestyle.  

Watch it.

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The Truffle Hunters is in select theaters on March 19, 2021. For showtimes, click here.

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Interview: Taylor Takahashi from Boogie, Asian Basketball Drama starring Pop Smoke, Taylour Paige, Eddie Huang

Taylor Takahashi, who plays the title role in Boogie discusses his Asian background, his love of basketball, and how he found this film. We also discuss some of his on court moves and what is next for him! So give it a watch and make sure to check out Boogie, available in theaters and on demand! Director: Eddie Huang Cast: Taylor Takahashi, Pamelyn Chee, Jorge Lendeborg Jr., Dave East, Alexa Mareka, Mike Moh, Taylour Paige, Perry Yung Synopsis: The film follows a young Chinese American basketball phenom Boogie (Takahashi) who struggles to balance the expectations of his immigrant family with his own dreams of becoming a player for the NBA.

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Nobody Review: A Middle Class, Family Man John Wick

Bob Odenkirk	...	Hutch Mansell Aleksey Serebryakov	Aleksey Serebryakov	...	Yulian Kuznetsov (as Alexey Serebryakov) Connie Nielsen	Connie Nielsen	...	Becca Mansell Christopher Lloyd	Christopher Lloyd	...	David Mansell Michael Ironside	Michael Ironside	...	Eddie Williams Colin Salmon	Colin Salmon	...	The Barber RZA	RZA	...	Harry Mansell Billy MacLellan	Billy MacLellan	...	Charlie Williams Araya Mengesha	Araya Mengesha	...	Pavel Gage Munroe	Gage Munroe	...	Blake Mansell Paisley Cadorath	Paisley Cadorath	...	Abby Mansell Aleksandr Pal	Aleksandr Pal	...	Teddy Kuznetsov Humberly González	Humberly González	...	Lupita Martin Edsson Morales	Edsson Morales	...	Luis Martin J.P. Manoux	J.P. Manoux	...	Pentagon Darren Adrian McLean	Adrian McLean	...	Joey

Release date: March 26, 2021
Running time: 92 minutes        
Starring: Bob Odenkirk, Connie Nielsen, RZA, Aleksey Serebryakov, and Christopher Lloyd
Director: Ilya Naishuller
Writer: Derek Kolstad

When two thieves break into his suburban home one night, Hutch (Bob Odenkirk) declines to defend himself or his family, hoping to prevent serious violence. His teenage son, Blake (Gage Munroe, The Shack), is disappointed in him and his wife, Becca (Connie Nielsen, Wonder Woman), seems to pull only further away.  The aftermath of the incident strikes a match to Hutch’s long-simmering rage, triggering dormant instincts and propelling him on a brutal path that will surface dark secrets and lethal skills. In a barrage of fists, gunfire and squealing tires, Hutch must save his family from a dangerous adversary (famed Russian actor Aleksey Serebryakov, Amazon’s McMafia)—and ensure that he will never be underestimated as a nobody again.

Ilya Naishuller	...	Hitman Anatoly Sergey Shnurov	Sergey Shnurov	...	Hitman Valentin Joanne Rodriguez	Joanne Rodriguez	...	Bus Driver Donna Stephanie Sy	Stephanie Sy	...	Realtor Daniel Rizzuto	Daniel Rizzuto	...	Gunman Ruslan Rusin	Ruslan Rusin	...	Gunman Vladimir Levkovsky	Vladimir Levkovsky	...	Gunman Dan Skene	Dan Skene	...	Gunman Bj Verot	Bj Verot	...	Gunman Dylan Rampulla	Dylan Rampulla	...	Gunman Margaryta Soldatova	Margaryta Soldatova	...	Gunman Megan Best	Megan Best	...	Woman on Bus Darya Charusha	Darya Charusha	...	Beta (as Dasha Naishuller) Neil Davison	Neil Davison	...	Albert Paul Essiembre	Paul Essiembre	...	Jim the Neighbor Adam Hurtig	Adam Hurtig	...	Police Gabriel Daniels	Gabriel Daniels	...	Police Kristen Harris	Kristen Harris	...	Detective Erik Athavale	Erik Athavale	...	Detective Thomas Soares	Thomas Soares	...	Alan Breiseth Neven Pajkic	Neven Pajkic	...	Big Brute Stephen McIntyre	Stephen McIntyre	...	Veteran Rick Dobran	Rick Dobran	...	Tattoo Shop Owner Richard Thomas	Richard Thomas	...	Security Guard (Obshak Basement) Alan Wong	Alan Wong	...	Doctor (as Alan Wh Wong) Sharon Bajer	Sharon Bajer	...	Receptionist Yulia Guzhva	Yulia Guzhva	...	Karaoke Singer Boris Gulyarin	Boris Gulyarin	...	Mob Boss Alex Nikolaychuk	Alex Nikolaychuk	...	Mob Boss Volodymyr Yamnenko	Volodymyr Yamnenko	...	Mob Boss Meaghan Ann De Werrenne Waller	Meaghan Ann De Werrenne Waller	...	Waitress (Karaoke Club) Eugene Baffoe	Eugene Baffoe	...	Barber's Guard Daniel Bernhardt	Daniel Bernhardt	...	Bus Goon Alain Moussi	Alain Moussi	...	Bus Goon Stephane Julien	Stephane Julien	...	Bus Goon Robert Heinamaki	Robert Heinamaki	...	Body Builder Brent Alarie	Brent Alarie	...	Tattoo Parlor Tyrell Witherspoon	Tyrell Witherspoon	...	Dancer
This film starts with a mysterious foreshadowing that gives you a hint of what happens but doesn't give away much.  And after this initial jolt, the film guides you into thinking that Hutch is your normal, middle class, worker with a lovely wife and kids and a boring, monotonous routine.  But this changes as you learn more about Hutch's backstory and his current predicament.  Your enjoyment of this film will largely depend on whether you can see Odenkirk as an action star.  And Odenkirk sells it well.  His more boring, buttoned up persona is there at the start, but when the action gets going he is a convincing fighter.  He is joined at times by other soldiers who add some fun variety to the overall fighting.  And on his quest, both Hutch and his various compatriots go through plenty of cannon fodder!.

And the action in this film is high energy and varied.  There is hand to hand combat, there is gunplay, there are explosions, and some improvised weapons.  Hutch dispatches people with whatever he has available, keeping the fighting interesting.  And what I also liked is that Hutch wasn't always just easily dispatching people.  Sometimes the fights would be slower and more brutal, and other times he would plow through enemies like a hot knife through butter.  And when these sequences happen, you can see why others fear him.

In fact, the whole setup for this film feels familiar, but that is not a bad thing.  The movie feels like a more family man, middle class, John Wick.  It has a lot of similarities, but Nobody has less of a supernatural component and more of an everyman one.  And Odenkirk is not as efficient a fighter as Reeves, but that is fine.  Despite the ridiculous setup and over-the-top situations, I really enjoyed Nobody.  I loved the variety in the action and the overall brutality of it all.  And Odenkirk really does carry the film as a reluctant fighter.  And to top it all off, the film has a high energy soundtrack to match the high energy fights.  Finally, Nobody concludes with a really intense and explosive final sequence that pulls everything together into one gigantic fightstravaganza. 

Nobody is a middle class, family man John Wick, with high energy and varied action, a mysterious story, and an epic, final fightsravaganza.

Watch it.

Directed by  Ilya Naishuller	...	(directed by)Writing Credits   Derek Kolstad	...	(written by)   Frederick Allen	...	Russian mafia member (uncredited) Destini Boldt	Destini Boldt	...	Club patreon (uncredited) Meghan Gardiner	Meghan Gardiner	...	News Reporter (uncredited) Jim Kirby	Jim Kirby	...	Bus Rider (uncredited) Richard Ledbetter	Richard Ledbetter	...	Tattoo Artist (uncredited) Steve Pacaud	Steve Pacaud	...	Construction Worker (uncredited) Produced by  Marc S. Fischer	...	executive producer David Leitch	...	producer (produced by) (p.g.a.) Kelly McCormick	...	producer (produced by) (p.g.a.) Bob Odenkirk	...	producer Scott Watson	...	associate producer Marc Provissiero	...	producer Braden Aftergood	...	producer (produced by) (p.g.a.) Derek Kolstad	...	executive producer
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Nobody is available in theaters on March 26, 2021.  For showtimes, click here.

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